TBT – The Sages of Technology

#TBT – A look back at the interviews, debates and documentaries about some of the most influential and important figures behind today’s #DigitalRevolution.

Digital Revolution Innovators and Pioneers

Steve Jobs and Bill Gates

Steve Jobs – Apple’s iconic CEO and builder of one of the most valuable companies on the planet with a market cap today near a half trillion dollars. Under Steve, Apple launched the iMac, the iPod, the iPhone, the iPad, iTunes and Apple retail stores would redefine commerce.

Bill Gates – The founder of Microsoft has changed the world through technology and charity. He brought personal computing to the masses. Windows was affordable, device agnostic, and welcomed outside partners. It still has over 80 percent market share. Gates also saved Apple with a $150 million infusion from Microsoft in 1997 when a returning Steve Jobs needed cash. There might be no iPod, iPhone,or iPad if Gates hadn’t stepped in.

 

Sergei Brin and Larry Paige

Like all good genius start-up stories, Larry Page and Sergey Brin founded Google Inc. in a friend’s garage in Menlo Park, Calif. Since its incorporation on September 4, 1998, the company has grown with a steady stream of new product developments, acquisitions, and partnerships and has extended its reach far beyond its modest beginnings as a web search engine. Perhaps even more impressive is Google’s image as the pinnacle of cool, with a reputation for being hip, innovative and wildly successful – all without compromising its “Don’t be evil” philosophy.

 

Mark Zuckerberg

FACEBOOK.

 

Marc Benioff and Hasso Plattner

At a Churchill Club event at the Computer History Museum in San Jose on April 3, 2008 Hasso Plattner, co-founder and chairman of SAP, and Marc Benioff, co-founder and CEO of Salesforce.com, debated the future of enterprise software. The debate was moderated by Quentin Hardy of Forbes.

 

Claude Shannon (April 30, 1916 – February 24, 2001) was an American mathematician, electronic engineer, and cryptographer known as “the father of information theory”

 

J. C. R. Licklider (March 11, 1915 – June 26, 1990) Joseph Carl Licklider was one of the first to foresee modern-style interactive computing, and its application to all manner of activities. Also remembered as an Internet pioneer, with an early vision of a worldwide computer network long before it was built.

 

Paul Baran (April 29, 1926 – March 26, 2011) A Polish-American engineer who was a pioneer in the development of computer networks. He was one of the two independent inventors of packet switched computer networking, and went on to start several companies and develop other technologies that are an essential part of modern digital communication.

 

Steve Crocker (born October 15, 1944) is the inventor of the Request for Comments (RFC) series, authoring the very first RFC and many more. He has worked in the Internet community since its inception. As a UCLA graduate student in the 1960s, he was part of the team that developed the protocols for the ARPANET which were the foundation for today’s Internet. For this work, Crocker was awarded the 2002 IEEE Internet Award. Crocker is chair of the board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, ICANN.

 

Who do you think deserves recognition?

 

 

What Balanced Marketing Looks Like

With the demands and expectations that businesses have of marketing on the rise, marketers may find their efforts out of balance with business goals. Now more than ever, marketers must be on alert and be aware of the three operating scenarios, ubiquitous in marketing, to prevent falling out of balance.

3 Operating Scenarios in Marketing:

Balanced Marketing – Marketing is balanced when people and teams are focused at every stage of the marketing closed loop process.

Tactical & Reactive – In a tactical and reactive marketing organization people a lot of work is being done without much planning and very little thought put into deliverables.

Analytical and Strategic – Over analysis leads to marketing paralysis – A lot of talking and planning without any action.

If your team is ideating, planning, building, running, observing, analyzing, reporting and repeating their programs and campaigns – marketing is balanced.

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Top 5 Polls: Social Media Usage

Please cast your vote on the following five polls and don’t forget to bookmark this page to monitor results. These polls will remain open through December 31, 2014.

Generation Gap

Social Media Logos

Computer or Mobile

Social Influence Animation

Social Strategy Drawing

 

Don’t forget to bookmark this page to monitor our results.

Thanks for stopping by!

 

 

 

Personalization, Demystified: How To Be ‘Spot On,’ Not ‘Creepy’

CMO.com: Personalization, Demystified: How To Be ‘Spot On,’ Not ‘Creepy’.

ARTICLE HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Why is it that the notion of personalization still eludes even savvy marketers and brands?
  • Personalization is outreach and digital alignment tied to recent interactions.
  • Cull more data, refine, personalize even more, then rinse and repeat.

Build Personas, Know Your Customers

Buyer personas are like sketches of the customers to whom your company serves. When creating a persona, it’s best to focus on one customer segment per product/service at a time. Once you’ve selected a target audience, you want to identify the influencers and decision makers within those companies and then create your persona around them.

Five Steps to Build a Persona

Step 1: Define their current situation

  • What are their priorities and what are they doing to meet their goals today?
  • What alternatives could be in place or are they considering?
  • What problems are limiting their success?

Step 2: Define their demographics

  • Job title
  • Years in current position and place in career – whether they’re young and just starting out or have spent most of their career with the same company and can provide insight on risk tolerance, influence increating change within the company, etc.
  • Company size and revenues
  • Industry

Step 3: Identify their attributes

  • Role – Their place in the company and who they answer to.
  • Responsibilities – What or who they manage and what outcomes they must achieve.
  • Threats – what could derail the deal?
  • Motivations – both professionally and based on company objectives – could also be what they want to avoid.
  • Influencers – who can aid in affirming the project or stall it from moving forward?

Step 4: Understand their preferences

  • Where do they spend time online? Offline?
  • How do they participate with social media? Do they?
  • What keywords, phrases and search terms resonate with them?

Step 5: Draft the buyer persona value statement

  • I need to solve [FILL IN BLANK], in order to achieve [FILL IN BLANK].

Speak to people and use third party data to help complete your personas. A few examples follow:

Use Business Intelligence Portals:

  • Search by industry, size, title.
  • Assess profiles, click through to review LinkedIn profiles.
  • Use at least ten profiles to identify common themes.
  • Access the industry information to gain insight to challenges and opportunities.
  • BI portals also offer in-depth research on specific industries, helping you to define priorities and challenges quickly.

Talk to Salespeople:

  • What areas of the business are they focused on?
  • Who are they speaking with?
  • How do prospects frame the problem?
  • Who else do they have to convince?

Talk to Customers:

  • What problem did we solve?
  • What else did that enable?
  • Why did they choose us?
  • What obstacles did they have to overcome to buy?

Knowing your audience and having a personalized business plan is a foolproof formula to create new business leads, and strengthen old ones.  If you know what companies need or want, and develop a marketing plan tailored for them, you will be more desirable to them than a marketing company that has not done their homework.

Infographic: Buyer Persona Process

Persona

When to Rebalance Marketing

With the demands and expectations that businesses have of marketing on the rise, marketers may find their efforts out of balance with business goals. Now more than ever, marketers must be on alert and be aware of the three operating scenarios, ubiquitous in marketing, to prevent falling out of balance.

3 Operating Scenarios in Marketing:

Balanced Marketing – Marketing is balanced when people and teams are focused at every stage of the marketing closed loop process.

Tactical & Reactive – In a tactical and reactive marketing organization people a lot of work is being done without much planning and very little thought put into deliverables.

Analytical and Strategic – Over analysis leads to marketing paralysis – A lot of talking and planning without any action.

If your team is ideating, planning, building, running, observing, analyzing, reporting and repeating their programs and campaigns – marketing is balanced.

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