#Marketing #Automation’s Star Is Rising – Enterprise Apps Today

There is a trend towards greater unification of #sales and #marketing functions…

#Marketing #automation aligns sales and marketing teams and helps them provide personalized interactions to prospects and customers.

Source: Marketing Automation’s Star Is Rising – Enterprise Apps Today

Predictive Analytics | Applying it to #Sales and #Marketing

Several weeks ago, I was in a meeting with a group of senior executives at one of the oldest business information companies in the United States, and the conversation shifted to lead generation:

“Results are horrendous, incredibly weak. Much of these leads are unusable. High percentages from Gmail, AOL, Hotmail… So many unknowns and, well, at least some decision makers, along with the rest of usual useless information.”

Anyone who works in today’s digital marketing space knows this is a common conversation that is hard to fix.

So, is bad #data the real issue for us or is it that we are chasing down the wrong path?

Think about it. We spend millions of dollars chasing individuals who download content, attend webinars or throw business cards into fishbowls at conferences and shows. We spend very little trying to figure out what is really going on inside a company of interest.

Things that sales and marketing agree on:

  • Purchasing is a team exercise
  • Figuring out what the consensus inside of buying teams is a tough job to figure out
  • There is a value to downloaded content as a proxy for team interest
  • An individual act tells us nothing about its organizations intent.

Is it time to devalue the downloaded white paper as our lead generation currency? (Sales people will love this one, Marketing, maybe not) 

More to the point, isn’t it time to evolve and begin the process of understanding the corporate body language through a variety of data points that are already available to us? Would it not be better to understand that the almighty download can and should be part of a larger canvas where a broader, more accurate picture emerges?

Even at it’s broadest level, #predictive #analytics can come in some simple forms.

6 examples of simple forms that apply basic predictive analytics:

  1. You can use any number of competitive search tools to understand what keywords and key phrases are collectively perceived as important when prospects begin their journey to find you
  2. And if you look historically backwards, you will be able to see what changed and potentially why
  3. You can also develop an understanding for funnel position (where companies are in the sales funnel by segmenting out keywords based on a natural progression of educating oneself.
  4. You can then use that analysis to make sure your own website is in tune editorially – are you mapping to what is important at that moment in time to companies that are consuming the content aligned with your objectives?
  5. You can find sites where these keywords exist ON PAGE in ways that align with your objectives. Page Indexing has grown up and become very sophisticated.
  6. Just this simple knitting together of these two components begin to give you an indication of trends and volume of content that is out there and that your prospects are consuming

Then do this:

  • Use IP identification and targeting to match who you see on your site and who is consuming the relevant content across the Web. This type of targeting will enable you to report back on which companies are most active in consuming specific keywords across contextually aligned sites.
  • This gives you a marriage of your data and external data that help you develop prioritization for sales, messaging across marketing, content development and most of all – IT GETS YOU OUT OF DEPENDING ON WHITE PAPER DOWNLOADS as your proxy for interest.
  • Once you add your crm and marketing automation data, revealing what companies you currently talk to are most engaged – you have a clear path to a strategy.

To review:

  • Analyze the competitive set to understand how everyone is deploying search and keywords
  • Utilize page indexing to understand where the content is
  • Use IP identification and targeting to tell you who and what and how many from where
  • Knit your own data in to complete the virtuous circle

The age of #Predictive #Automation is upon us. Take the initial steps needed to understand organizational #intent and funnel position, and your sales organization will stop complaining about those lousy leads you send them.

Welcome to the Age of Predictive Analytics

Several weeks ago, I was in a meeting with a group of senior executives at one of the oldest business information companies in the United States, and the conversation shifted to lead generation:

“Results are horrendous, incredibly weak. Much of these leads are unusable. High percentages from Gmail, AOL, Hotmail… So many unknowns and, well, at least some decision makers, along with the rest of usual useless information.”

Anyone who works in today’s digital marketing space knows this is a common conversation that is hard to fix.

So, is bad #data the real issue for us or is it that we are chasing down the wrong path?

Think about it. We spend millions of dollars chasing individuals who download content, attend webinars or throw business cards into fishbowls at conferences and shows. We spend very little trying to figure out what is really going on inside a company of interest.

Things that sales and marketing agree on:

  • Purchasing is a team exercise
  • Figuring out what the consensus inside of buying teams is a tough job to figure out
  • There is a value to downloaded content as a proxy for team interest
  • An individual act tells us nothing about its organizations intent.

Is it time to devalue the downloaded white paper as our lead generation currency? (Sales people will love this one, Marketing, maybe not) 

More to the point, isn’t it time to evolve and begin the process of understanding the corporate body language through a variety of data points that are already available to us? Would it not be better to understand that the almighty download can and should be part of a larger canvas where a broader, more accurate picture emerges?

Even at it’s broadest level, #predictive #analytics can come in some simple forms.

6 examples of simple forms that apply basic predictive analytics:

  1. You can use any number of competitive search tools to understand what keywords and key phrases are collectively perceived as important when prospects begin their journey to find you
  2. And if you look historically backwards, you will be able to see what changed and potentially why
  3. You can also develop an understanding for funnel position (where companies are in the sales funnel by segmenting out keywords based on a natural progression of educating oneself.
  4. You can then use that analysis to make sure your own website is in tune editorially – are you mapping to what is important at that moment in time to companies that are consuming the content aligned with your objectives?
  5. You can find sites where these keywords exist ON PAGE in ways that align with your objectives. Page Indexing has grown up and become very sophisticated.
  6. Just this simple knitting together of these two components begin to give you an indication of trends and volume of content that is out there and that your prospects are consuming

Then do this:

  • Use IP identification and targeting to match who you see on your site and who is consuming the relevant content across the Web. This type of targeting will enable you to report back on which companies are most active in consuming specific keywords across contextually aligned sites.
  • This gives you a marriage of your data and external data that help you develop prioritization for sales, messaging across marketing, content development and most of all – IT GETS YOU OUT OF DEPENDING ON WHITE PAPER DOWNLOADS as your proxy for interest.
  • Once you add your crm and marketing automation data, revealing what companies you currently talk to are most engaged – you have a clear path to a strategy.

To review:

  • Analyze the competitive set to understand how everyone is deploying search and keywords
  • Utilize page indexing to understand where the content is
  • Use IP identification and targeting to tell you who and what and how many from where
  • Knit your own data in to complete the virtuous circle

The age of #Predictive #Automation is upon us. Take the initial steps needed to understand organizational #intent and funnel position, and your sales organization will stop complaining about those lousy leads you send them.

3 Trends Occupying Retail CMOs in 2015 – Harte Hanks Blog

3 Trends Occupying Retail CMOs in 2015 – Harte Hanks Blog.

The Sales and Marketing Promance | Technology not included

Many businesses lack the alignment between the sales and marketing organizations. Whether you agree or disagree, it’s important to understand the barriers that prevent alignment. Some common barriers include:

  • Success in the sales and marketing departments is measured differently
  • Sales and marketing have a different vision of the ideal target customer
  • Actionable customer insight sits in disconnected databases
  • There is a lack of a 360-degree view of customers and their buying preferences
  • Broken processes make it impossible to track what is working
  • The technology is too hard to use so that there is limited adoption

These barriers lead to the disconnect and are making it difficult for organizations to make the most of their sales opportunities and go to market investments. As an example, companies are unable to provide the right offers to the right people, at the right time, because customer insights live in disparate locations and the company’s go-to-market strategies are uncoordinated and inefficient.

To address this disconnect, businesses are turning to applications and new technology to help build cohesive sales and marketing alliances. The common mistake businesses have been making in their rush to technology is that they forget to address their people and process challenges first. 

The promises of the Digital Revolution and emerging technologies are often not in line with management’s expectations. Many mid to large sized companies rushed to replace older systems that worked, to new and unproven cloud based technologies that are not living up to expectations. Many of these decisions were based on unrealistic, pie-in the sky, cloud-high promises (no pun intended) and the pain is just beginning to be felt by customers.

The reality is that many companies launched into cloud based technologies without a good business plan. So perhaps 2015 will be the year many companies awaken to a reality check.

The pendulum is about to swing in another direction. Brace yourselves.

Good times ahead.

CX | The User Adoption Challenge | Marketing Automation

The word “automation” leads many people to believe that they are at risk of being replaced. The irony in the world of sales and marketing is that people are the key ingredient to automation’s success.

There are three areas where people in sales and marketing must be aligned for any sales and marketing automation program to be successful:

  1. User adoption
  2. Innovation
  3. Continuous transformation

Below are some suggestions to help you take on these areas from within your organization all of which require a little communication:

  1. Create an annual internal social/PR campaign about your program
  2. Set and communicate the goals and milestones reached
  3. Identify your innovators, early adopters, mid-stage adopters and laggards; they all matter.
  4. Ask for feedback and ideas and recognize anyone that shares
  5. Communicate successes, gaps or areas that need improvement

Below are several sample internal communications to help get you started:

Internal Communication #1

What is the Sales and Marketing Automation Program?

The Sales and Marketing Automation Program is comprised of two SaaS solutions that connects to a data warehouse.

Key Features of the Program:

  • Users have access to fresh business information that covers the entire family trees of their target accounts
  • Automated lead progression and qualification based on demographic and behavioral lead scoring algorithms
  • Automated delivery of relevant content to clients that’s based on inferred or intrinsic levels of interest at the contact and company levels
  • Automated trigger alerts with account monitoring to alert end users of sales triggers like executive change, project announcements, mergers & acquisitions, etc. happen

Internal Communication #2:

Goals and milestones reached:

X months have passed since we launched our company’s Sales & Marketing Automation Program and our results to date have been strong. Our lead generation rate and impact to pipeline this year is ahead of last year’s results by approximately X% [Share your demand generation and pipeline summary details]. It’s important to note, that these results were achieved as a direct result of the collaboration between the sales and marketing community. The rollout, to our first group of end users in sales was completed last week. In total, we now have X # of sales and marketing users who are actively using the program. We plan to roll out our solution to the rest of our sales and marketing community over the next X months. Stay tuned.

Internal Communication #3

Identify your innovators, early adopters, mid-stage adopters and laggards:

Driving user adoption took longer than anticipated on our first roll-out. To address some of the challenges posed on our initial roll out, we will host a series of webinars over the course of the year, with the first series of webinars focusing solely on training and best practices.

Internal Communication #4

Ask for feedback and ideas and recognize anyone that shares:

We’ve identified other risk factors that could become barriers to our success, like budget constraints (content development, telemarketing, training, etc.)

Please communicate and share any challenges or barriers to success that you foresee or encounter during our organization’s transformation to the group here.

Internal Communication #5

Communicate successes, gaps or areas that need improvement:

We will monitor program usage, lead acquisition rates, funnel progression, and client interaction throughout our roll out and transformation.

Succinct communications to the users, future users, stakeholders, and leadership is what ultimately drives continuous innovation and adoption to change, and remember that user perception matters in the adoption process:

  1. Relative Advantage: How improved an innovation is over the previous generation.
  2. Compatibility: The level of compatibility that an innovation has to be assimilated into his or her life.
  3. Complexity or Simplicity: If the innovation is perceived as complicated or difficult to use, an individual is unlikely to adopt it.
  4. Trialability: How easily an innovation may be experimented. If a user is able to test an innovation, the individual will be more likely to adopt it.
  5. Observability: The extent that an innovation is visible to others. An innovation that is more visible will drive communication among the individual’s peers, which in turn will create more positive reactions.

Reference sources: Everett Rogers “The Diffusion of Innovations”

Marketing Automation: The User Adoption Challenge

The word “automation” leads many people to believe that they are at risk of being replaced. The irony in the world of sales and marketing is that people are the key ingredient to automation’s success.

There are three areas where people in sales and marketing must be aligned for any sales and marketing automation program to be successful:

  1. User adoption
  2. Innovation
  3. Continous transformation

Below are some suggestions to help you take on these areas from within your organization all of which require a little communication:

  1. Create an annual internal social/PR campaign about your program
  2. Set and communicate the goals and milestones reached
  3. Identify your innovators, early adopters, mid-stage adopters and laggards; they all matter.
  4. Ask for feedback and ideas and recognize anyone that shares
  5. Communicate successes, gaps or areas that need improvement

Below are several sample internal communications to help get you started:

Internal Communication #1

What is the Sales and Marketing Automation Program?

The Sales and Marketing Automation Program is comprised of two SaaS solutions that connects to a data warehouse.

Key Features of the Program:

  • Users have access to fresh business information that covers the entire family trees of their target accounts
  • Automated lead progression and qualification based on demographic and behavioral lead scoring algorithms
  • Automated delivery of relevant content to clients that’s based on inferred or intrinsic levels of interest at the contact and company levels
  • Automated trigger alerts with account monitoring to alert end users of sales triggers like executive change, project announcements, mergers & acquisitions, etc. happen

Internal Communication #2:

Goals and milestones reached:

X months have passed since we launched our company’s Sales & Marketing Automation Program and our results to date have been strong. Our lead generation rate and impact to pipeline this year is ahead of last year’s results by approximately X% [Share your demand generation and pipeline summary details]. It’s important to note, that these results were achieved as a direct result of the collaboration between the sales and marketing community. The rollout, to our first group of end users in sales was completed last week. In total, we now have X # of sales and marketing users who are actively using the program. We plan to roll out our solution to the rest of our sales and marketing community over the next X months. Stay tuned.

Internal Communication #3

Identify your innovators, early adopters, mid-stage adopters and laggards:

Driving user adoption took longer than anticipated on our first roll-out. To address some of the challenges posed on our initial roll out, we will host a series of webinars over the course of the year, with the first series of webinars focusing solely on training and best practices.

Internal Communication #4

Ask for feedback and ideas and recognize anyone that shares:

We’ve identified other risk factors that could become barriers to our success, like budget constraints (content development, telemarketing, training, etc.)

Please communicate and share any challenges or barriers to success that you foresee or encounter during our organization’s transformation to the group here.

Internal Communication #5

Communicate successes, gaps or areas that need improvement:

We will monitor program usage, lead acquisition rates, funnel progression, and client interaction throughout our roll out and transformation.

Succinct communications to the users, future users, stakeholders, and leadership is what ultimately drives continuous innovation and adoption to change, and remember that user perception matters in the adoption process:

  1. Relative Advantage: How improved an innovation is over the previous generation.
  2. Compatibility: The level of compatibility that an innovation has to be assimilated into his or her life.
  3. Complexity or Simplicity: If the innovation is perceived as complicated or difficult to use, an individual is unlikely to adopt it.
  4. Trialability: How easily an innovation may be experimented. If a user is able to test an innovation, the individual will be more likely to adopt it.
  5. Observability: The extent that an innovation is visible to others. An innovation that is more visible will drive communication among the individual’s peers, which in turn will create more positive reactions.

Reference sources: Everett Rogers “The Diffusion of Innovations”

Effective Email Marketing

Thanks to anti-SPAM laws and ongoing efforts by vendors and marketers who have worked to ensure credibility, consumers can trust their email. However, it’s critical that email marketers stay abreast of evolving trends and technologies because what worked before may not work today.

One important trend is that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have emerged as a kind of meta-audience, which email marketers must understand and with whom they must cultivate relationships. ISPs serve as gatekeepers who decide which emails get through and which do not.

Once you’ve gotten your message through, you still combat the email overload your recipient may be experiencing. Permission-based marketing offers guidelines for opt-in programs based on the simple and proven premise that people will read what they ask for, and tend to delete or flag as SPAM what they have not requested.

Understand How to Build Reputation

Since ISPs act as gatekeepers, it’s critical to build your reputation by establishing the credibility of your domain name and the deliverability of your recipients’ addresses. You’ll want to test your email to smaller audiences before you execute a major campaign.

To establish your company as a legitimate email marketer with ISPs, follow these eight guidelines:

  1. Establish email accounts with the free email providers. Use Yahoo, Gmail, etc. to start building your deliverability rating and to test sample lists.
  2. Create seed lists to test mailings. Try before you fly. What you are after prior to an actual email campaign is a well-vetted list of people who have opted-in to receive your information. You may have “warm leads” from other marketing initiatives, if not, you will have to build your own list.

  3. Warm up your IP address. This builds your reputation with ISPs. The process involves sending small amounts of email through a new-unused IP address in order to establish a positive deliverability reputation. This takes several weeks, so plan ahead. 
If you want to warm your own IP, don’t send to your entire mailing at once. Break it into smaller groups. Give ISPs a chance to see the types of messages that are coming through and let them establish a sending reputation. If you give the ISPs a chance to get to know you and the types of email you are sending, it will give them a chance to gradually establish a sender reputation for you, which will work to your advantage.

  4. Honor abuse reports. Treat them like unsubscribe requests. Set up and monitor accounts such as abuse@yourdomain.com or postmaster@yourdomain.com.

  5. Be aware of ISPs’ acceptable use policies. Stay up-to-date with the various ISP policies to ensure your emails get delivered now and in the future.

  6. Implement a thorough SPAM complaint, bounce, or reply emails resolution process. To ensure clean contact lists and prompt follow-up of legitimate customer replies, implement a process to handle “out of office” replies, unsubscribe requests, SPAM complaints, and general replies.

  7. If you plan to use a branded domain (e.g. @yourcompanyname.com), publish 
your authentication. This practice helps ensure good delivery rates and reputation. Authentication does require some action by your IT staff to implement.

  8. Do not attach Word or other documents. Many ISPs now identify attachments as SPAM. And if they haven’t, some users have blocked it from their inboxes to save storage. Include links to sites where people can download information instead.

 

Acquire Email Addresses the Right Way

Rates of return on email campaigns correspond directly to the quality of email recipients. If your organization harbors any old notions of buying mass mailing lists and sending 
out vast, indiscriminate marketing pitches via email, blow those notions up now!

In this era of permission-based marketing, it’s critical that your audience opt-in to receive the information from you. Make opting-in very easy with highly visible single-click options, and unsubscribing should be that easy too.

To make sure you’re acquiring email addresses the right way, follow these three guidelines:

  1. Send email only to those who have opted-in. Again, the idea is simple; people are overloaded but they will generally read what they’ve asked for.
  • Obtain opt-in permission via common methods. These include single opt-in, double opt-in, or confirmed opt-in (see glossary for detail on these terms). Be sure your marketing automation provider delivers the tools to easily track who asked for what and when. Not only is this critical to communicate effectively with customers, but 
you can learn a lot about how to influence them by noticing their communication preferences.

  • Always be up-front. State clearly what the contact is opting-in for. After gaining their permission, the credibility of your brand and the quality of their customer experience hinges in part on giving them what they thought they were receiving. Do not be misleading.

  • Do the Internal Work and Align with Sales

    Marketers do not work alone. Define the internal dependencies on which the success of your email campaign depends. Ensure that all customer touch points within your organization, such as customer support or sales, know about upcoming campaigns.

    Remember, many customers are touching or being touched by other facets of your organization, maybe even within marketing, increase your success by being consistent across all channels.

    Using CRM applications, many marketers today make it a standard practice to check whether there’s an open customer support incident before sending out proactive emails. Similarly, some customer support organizations share incident information with marketing so they can follow-up with timely emails regarding upgrades or new programs.

    To make sure you’re doing the inside work, follow these three guidelines:

    1. Ensure cross-organizational support for and knowledge of email campaigns.
  • Make sure you have the reporting tools in place to support campaign goals. This means you need a marketing automation application that tracks intended action completion, such as a form submittal, form download, or purchase. Integration between your web and email marketing tools is vital here.

  • Review invalid contact reports. Stand by the integrity of your mailing list at all times. Be aware of how many contacts are invalidated with each mailing. Undeliverable email is inevitable, but a high volume suggests the need to reevaluate or clean up your list.

  • Content is King

    Once you’ve followed these best practices to ensure that your messages get through, it’s time to work on the most important part, content.

    Remember that content is king…

    Here are some content guidelines:

    1. Remind the contact why they are receiving this email. Include a link to opt-out and to update their profile information. Have both of these at the top of the email.
    2. Ask contacts to add the “From” address to their address book. This ensures consistent delivery.
    3. Use a consistent template. The basic formatting of your email marketing messages is not the place you want to differentiate yourself. As with a business letter, putting things where people expect them speeds expedition of requested actions and ultimately supports better rates of return. A common template provides a consistent customer experience and should include spaces for: email opt-in, email format correction, add-to-address book, company website and contact information, relevant copyright references, opt-out, privacy policy, profile update, and “reply-to” policy if different from the “reply- to” address.
    4. Include your privacy policy. Tell contacts how their profile information will and will not be used. Assure contacts that their information will never to rented or sold unless they specifically opt-in to partner email programs.
    5. Allow contacts to easily update their profiles. Have information already filled in, so contacts can simply enter a cursor to type in a new address, information about their internet connection, and so on.
    6. Ensure the “from” and “reply-to” addresses make sense to your contacts. A clear “from” address increases recognition of the message to recipients and ISPs.
    7. Make the “subject” line and body copy sensible and intuitive. State up-front any terms or special conditions, such as with an offer or promotion.
    8. AVOID special characters or jumbles of letters and numbers as these can identify your mail as SPAM. Consider that commonly known acronyms in your industry may be senseless jumble to an ISP.
    9. Ensure your content is internally approved by all necessary stakeholders, including the legal department.
    10. Target your campaign to specific audiences. The narrower the better. By tracking demographics, previous campaign history, offer acceptance, and interests stated in the customer’s profile, over time you should be able to deliver increasingly timely messages demonstrating ever-greater levels of specificity.
    11. Balance images and text.
    12. Use test cells to optimize mailings. Test randomly selected segments of your audience to try out different approaches. For example, try different subject lines or body copy to different groups of the same or very similar audiences.
    13. Test email content for SPAM identification.
    14. Include the physical postal address of your organization within your email. All emails governed by CAN-SPAM must contain a physical address or valid P.O. Box of your organization.

    Ghosts In Your Machine

    Ghosts In Your B2B Machine by Charlie Tarzian

    I have been absolutely deluged by companies telling me I should put their pixel on my clients’ sites so we can tell who is coming to the site. It’s as if all these guys (you know who you are) discovered reverse IP lookup at the same time (maybe the same industry show?) and now have a bright, new, shiny object to launch their ambitions for world domination.

    Having been in the IP targeting, IP aggregation, IP reporting world these last 3 – 4 years I am amused at how easy these guys make it seem.

    ‘Yes, that is exactly right. Just add water and stir and you will be creating deliciously magnificent lead gen – right before your eyes! No muss, no fuss.’

    Folks, I have news for you – if it were that easy – none of us would have jobs.

    Let me try and lay this out for you:

    • There is a reverse IP lookup capability available for licensing from a number of vendors – and it is real time
    • These vendors (actually my 13 year old geek at home) can use the published API and pass IP addresses and have returned the provenance of that IP address – who manages it and what is the master domain
    • There are currently between 3 – 4 billion IP addresses that are out there in the world – so there is obviously a great opportunity to utilize lookup services
    • So we are all good here as far as value, right?

    Not really.

    Here is the harsh reality:

    • 70 – 80% of your traffic is masked because it is ISP traffic. This means that the individual coming to a site has broadband access through one of the many (I think there are close to 3,000 in the US) ISP’s.
    • Depending on what your product/service offering is you will also have up to 50% of your traffic coming from overseas – which could be a good or a bad thing depending on your sales strategy
    • Identifying the IP address is just the first of a few steps you need to take in order to benefit from this exercise. An IP address can and will be shared by many people in a corporate infrastructure
    • The singular fact that someone from some company came to the website and poked around tells a fractional story about the buying team inside of that company and how decisions are made
    • Rolling up this data into intelligence you can execute against is a commitment to a Predictive Automation architecture where data drives many channels

    So before you jump at this once in a lifetime opportunity of reverse IP lookup, ask the following questions:

    To the vendor

    • What is the % of IP addresses you resolve for your client base?
    • Of the % that you don’t on the real time first pass, how many can you resolve if it was not a real time need?
    • If you claim to resolve ISP addresses – explain your methodology – how to you get from a dynamic ISP address to a specific company in a specific location?

    To your internal marketing ops team

    • Can we knit this data together with our marketing automation, Google Analytics/Omniture/etc…, social listening, campaign, web logs, and so forth to give us a more rounded view of how we should prioritize and score this data?
    • Have we or will we be integrating these data channels into an executable architecture so that it doesn’t take weeks to move what is real time data into some form of communications stream?
    • Do we have enough prospects in our own customer database to push our content into these companies (rather than wait for someone to download) and if we do not – can we find reputable 3 party data sources that can help fill in the holes?

    Once you have your answers to these questions, you can begin to plot out a Predictive Automation strategy that allows you to deploy the right messaging in near real time to the right companies in the right locations to the right individuals.

    Not only can this be done – it is being done. Companies like Prelytix (www.prelytix.com) have integrated all of the above into an easy to understand, highly actionable dashboard with API’s into a variety of MarTech platforms.

    And with the recent announcement that Adobe and Publicis are all in on Always On – you will begin to see more and more players jump into Predictive Automation.

    In the meantime, get ahead of the curve and start plotting out what you need to be successful when the snake oil IP resolution dudes come aknockin’.

     

    About the author:

    Charlie Tarzian is a big data and digital marketing thought leader who has held various C-level positions in the agency, direct marketing, information technology and database services industries.